A Kentucky nursing home facing serious violations has had its funding terminated by Medicare and Medicaid. Local news outlets report that on Thursday, September 16th, the money stopped flowing to a Louisville facility. Kentucky officials have now begun moving residents of the nursing home out. Terminating federal funds to a nursing home facility is the most severe civil sanction the government can impose on a care facility.

The nursing home had incurred steep fines since June. Between June 16th and September 16th, the facility racked up a total of $613,000 in fines from the federal government. However, allegations of abuse and poor procedures were nothing new for the facility. A state inspection of the nursing home from April found several serious problems and deficiencies at the facility. The state’s 337- page report cited examples of residents being slapped, punched, and scratched by each other. A resident allegedly broke their arm in a fall after being shoved by another resident. Another individual broke their hand when a television was thrown at them by a resident. 

The April report also indicates instances of inappropriate sexual contact between residents, some of whom may not have been able to give their consent. One inspector also observed an unlocked dresser drawer in a resident’s room which contained 22 medication cups. These cups had at least 37 different medications in them. Many of these drugs had not been prescribed to the resident. Several notations in the report found that numerous residents said that calls went unanswered by staff members. Residents were left to wait for hours for help and necessities. Page after page of descriptions from state inspectors began to paint a grim picture of care at the facility.

On August 24th, there was another inspection at the nursing home. During this inspection, it was determined that the facility was still not in compliance with federal regulations. The inspection report found staffing shortages and improper care of bedsores and wounds. The inspection also noted that the home failed to investigate a sexual abuse claim. Some residents could even be heard yelling through the hallways about wanting to be let “out of this prison.”

On September 13th, a letter from CMS notified the facility that the violations “constituted immediate jeopardy to residents’ health and safety that is ongoing.” Although funds have been terminated, payments will continue to the nursing home for 30 days. These payments are meant to help ensure a safe and orderly transfer of residents to other locations. The facility now has 60 days to appeal the termination.

These problems at the nursing home don’t appear to be new. The government’s own Medicare website, CMS, lists the facility as having only one star out of five. It has also been flagged for abusing residents. To be clear, many of the violations noted constitute abuse, both physical and emotional.

If you or a loved one is being abused in a nursing home setting, contact the experienced legal team at Hare, Wynn, Newell & Newton, LLP for help. We will take your claims seriously and investigate the circumstances of your situation. We can also help you hold negligent caregivers or facilities accountable for their actions. You may not be able to wait for the government to take action. If you suspect abuse call us today at (859) 550-2900. We offer a free and confidential legal consultation.